Tenth Graders Navigate Detroit’s Borders and Boundaries

The Academic Research Program develops the necessary skills, resources and knowledge for students to perform an independent project with the clear goal of contributing to an ongoing scholarly discourse. Across four years of study, students learn what scholarly research is and how it functions in educational conversations. They practice the research process in their coursework and acquire a broad spectrum of credible sources to tap during problem-solving. They create outcomes and share their results with peers and the community. Students graduate with a project they initiated and completed over the course of four years.

Tenth Grade students practice the research and writing protocol across the curriculum as part of ongoing sessions devoted to pragmatic topics situated in the landscape of Detroit. Moving beyond the classroom, students immerse themselves in local and contemporary situations, experiencing an environment ripe for investigation. Interactions with the arts, natural resources, city government, ethnic neighborhoods and other Detroit features train students to apply the skills and processes they possess.

The Sophomore class began their second session of the Academic Research Program (ARP 10) on Thursday, January 23 at The Detroit Historical Museum. Tours encompassed various exhibits: Frontiers to Factories, America’s Motor City, The Arsenal of Democracy, and The Underground Railroad. Students also participated in an activity to provide them with strategies for viewing artifacts as primary sources when conducting historical research. “It was a great day,” explains Jack Ninivaggi, “I learned a lot.” Rita Sidhu appreciated the Motor City exhibit “because it showed a lot of the history of a part of Detroit we know and take great pride in.” Alexander Dow thought “the exhibit donated by Kid Rock was really cool.” For most of the students, this was their first trip to the Historical Museum, which has preserved our region’s rich history through the collection and conservation of artifacts.

On Friday, January 24, the tenth-graders returned to The Walter P. Reuther Library to explore the borders and boundaries in and around Detroit and the advantages and challenges of these demarcations. Using a protocol designed to include time to read, collaborate, reflect, and summarize, students looked primary and secondary documents with maps, stats, articles, photographs, and literature. Isaiah Hines Bailey explained, “The question about borders lends itself to different ways of looking at it. Our group started out stating that race creates borders, but then Molly [Murphy] noted that religion also determines where a family might live. So, we came up with labels that define socio-economic status, way of life, level of crime, and friendships: money, neighborhoods, jobs, and education.” Groups presented their ideas on the most important border or boundary to a panel consisting of Mr. William LeFevre, reference archivist at the Reuther Library, Stacey Stevens, Freda Sampson, Theresa Tran, Jessica Best from The Michigan Roundtable, and Mr. David Nicholson a member of Wayne State’s Board of Governors and a trustee of the Detroit Historical Society. Associate Dean of Faculty, Mr. Bart Bronk, “liked that the students had to grapple with difficult questions posed by the panel.” The panel also provided historical and political contexts for further explorations to consider. Brett Abdelnour compared this experience to September’s when they were asked to identify Detroit’s three most important icons or institutions, “This time I understood the expectations so I chose to be more engaged and I found the question to be more interesting.”

Written by: Shernaz Minwalla, Director of the Academic Research Program

Sixth-graders rapt by mummies

Bright and early this morning our sixth-grade students visited the Penn Museum without leaving the Liggett campus. Students participated in a virtual field trip to the museum where they learned about the ancient practice of mummification through discussion with museum staff and an actual demonstration of the mummification process on a life-sized model.

Continue reading only if you are not faint of heart, and if an appropriate amount of time has passed since lunch!

The demonstration started with a very life-like looking model called, “Mr. Penn.” Students helped walk the museum leaders through the mummification process of Mr. Penn by answering questions like, “how do you remove the brain from a mummy?” The answer of course was a resounding, “through his nose!” Facts were shared throughout each piece of the process such as the history of mummification, a process devised to create a preserved vessel for one’s departed spirit, information on Egyptian culture and information about the human body’s organs.

Penn Museum put on quite a show! They had a camera set-up to demonstrate the mummification process and a separate close-up camera to demonstrate different principles of the process, such as a little experiment done with a raisin and a grape that showed how mummies shrink when the water is removed from their bodies. It was very interactive. Students were asked questions about what they were observing on the screen throughout the process, and slides were interspersed throughout the presentation to read and discuss.

Enjoy photos from the presentation below!

Yes, you can have two desserts at lunch!

Today the fifth-graders visited Middle School for an initial glimpse into the lives of their future sixth-grade selves. It was quite an exciting afternoon!

First, the students met with Mr. Brewer and Mr. McTigue for a presentation on student life in the Middle School. They spoke about the block schedule and advisory period, and all about electives, which you can imagine was a topic that caused a ton of excitement! There was talk of sports like volleyball, basketball and baseball, and questions on morning meeting.

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Sixth-graders answer questions about the Middle School

After an initial overview of next year, a panel of current sixth-graders were asked to join the group for a question and answer session. This is where the real fun began as a flurry of hands swung all over the place with burning questions like “how many desserts can you have at lunch?” and “how wide is your locker?” For inquiring minds who want to know the lockers are 17 inches wide! Have no fear though, the topics took a more serious tone too as students shared which classes were their favorite and how many hours of homework they have each night. It was a fun and informative panel who left their new fifth-grade friends all the more excited about the transition to Middle School.

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Fifth-graders raise their hands when asked, “who’s ready to start sixth-grade tomorrow?”

The last stop of the day was a 25-minute excursion to a real Middle School class. Students participated in language classes including Spanish and Chinese. They had a blast, and the proof is in the picture at the right. It was taken when Mr. Brewer asked, “who’s ready to start sixth-grade tomorrow?” We think the hands say it all!